Diana A. Burnett

Anthropology News  Co-Contributing Editor

rsz_blmDiana A. Burnett is a Ph.D. candidate in Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include diaspora and transnationalism, racial health inequities, Black religious and spiritual communities, nutrition-related chronic disease prevention, and medical anthropology. Diana’s current research project examines a transnational community’s efforts to recover and implement indigenous strategies to reduce and prevent non-communicable chronic disease. Burnett received her MPH from the University of Pennsylvania, MDiv from Yale Divinity School and her BA from Hampton University.

About k. nyerere ture 7 Articles
K. Nyerere Ture` is a practicing cultural anthropologist/criminologist and an educator, who teaches Anthropology, Criminology/Criminal Justice and Sociology at Morgan State University, at the rank of Assistant Professor. Ture` earned a BA in African/African American Studies and Criminal Justice at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey and a MA in Applied Anthropology at Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. He is currently a doctoral candidate in the Department of Anthropology at American University in Washington, DC. Building on his undergraduate and master level graduate research focus that explored the relationship between community crime and urban development, Ture's current dissertation research examines the lived experiences of African American public housing residents in the throws of an urban renewal that examples the continued perpetuation of structural violence against marginal communities of color. The particular site of Ture’s doctoral research (research completed in spring 2013) is one of the most historical African American neighborhoods within Washington, DC and the largest and currently the most ill-reputed public housing community in the nation’s capitol. This public housing community is called Barry Farm Public Dwellings by city officials and outsiders, but referred locally as the “Farms.” The Farms is located east of the Anacostia River (EoR) - a river that forms an expansive separation between the majority African American community from the District of Columbia’s main land. The Farms' represents an intentional place built by the federal government as an antithetical place - an African American Urban Ghetto (AAUG) and its current redevelopment represents a re-articulation of both place and identity whereby the privilege enjoys an underemphasis on race and an emphasis on disposable income vis-a-vis the increased emphasis and salience of race for the poor and their further assault by structural violence. The Farms' community serve as a metaphor for the continued devalued treatment of people of color in the United States of America (USA).